artist l choreographer l movement director
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BIO

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monica Julianna Mirabile

b. Clearwater Beach, FL 1988

I am an interdisciplinary artist working in performance, video sculpture, choreography and installation. My work deals with the processing of information in the body. I look at behavior as a reflective vehicle and use this choreography to create performance art. Often referred to as dance, the body in movement is my main source of inspiration. Having finished a Sculpture BFA at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore MD I have gone on to produce a multitude of large and small scale productions and projects including Authority figure (a 150 person mobile installation in the Knockdown Center, 2016) and A Ghost Story ( an ongoing choreographed series). In 2011, a collective I founded with friends won the merit of best stage production in the Baltimore City Paper alongside a Baker Artist Award from The Baltimore Museum of Art.

In 2012 I moved to NY to continue my collaboration with Sigrid Lauren of Fluct. FlucT is a collaboration addressing issues in the capital obedience of American culture through choreography and performance. We create original narrative soundscapes linking a manipulated pop music psychosis with violently intimate dance, our composition is a projection driven to expose the psychology of this social paradigm.

Driven by the necessity to collaborate, I have worked with many beautiful people over the years and continue to build a strong force field.  With director Zia Anger I have choreographed music videos for Maggie Rogers, Mitski, and Nick Hakim. I have moved in close collaboration with SOPHIE, Blood Orange, Pictureplane and MNDR.  Also, in 2013 I founded Otion Front Studio, a performance/dance space in the Bushwick neighborhood of New York. 

This work has been reviewed by FADER, New York Times, Vice’s Creators Project, and Paper Magazine, among others. It has been shown at the Guggenheim, Queens Museum, Signal, MOMA PS1 and Maccarone Gallery and was recently acquired into the Whitney Museum's permanent collection.